Triennale Design Museum
Coordination of the visual communication for the
7th edition of Triennale Design Museum.
triennale design museum
The “strada novissima”—the main pathway in the exhibition.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
triennale design museum
Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
triennale design museum
Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
italo lupi manifesto
Preliminary graphics for the
posters, designed when
the title was supposed to
be Autodasé.

2014 © Italo Lupi + Nicola-Matteo Munari
7th Edition

The 7th edition of Triennale Design Museum was dedicated to the theme of ‘Italian Design Beyond The Crises,’ focusing on three crucial moments in the history of Italian design—1930s’ autarky, 1970s’ austerity, and contemporary self-production.

Conceived by Silvana Annicchiarico—director of the museum from 2007 to 2018—and curated by Beppe Finessi—editor-in-chief of Inventario magazine—the exhibition promoted the idea that difficulties and constraints imposed by economical crises stimulate experimentation and creativity in design.
triennale design benedetta mori ubaldini
The large opening room with
a chronicle of Italian design
displayed along the wall.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
triennale design museum autarchia
A perspective of the “strada
novissima” with monographic
rooms and displays.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
triennale design museum
Advertisements designed for
the exhibition have been
published on the most important
Italian newspapers.

Ph. © Nicola-Matteo Munari
Exhibit and Graphic Design

The design of the exhibition was developed by French designer Philippe Nigro (1975), who revisited the museum’s spaces in an original way by playing with the contrasts full-empty and complete-incomplete.

The visual communication was designed under the direction of graphic design master Italo Lupi (1934) and—beyond exhibition graphics—included advertisements, posters, flyers, catalogue, tram liveries, leaflets, and more.
triennale design tram milano
Detail of a livery designed
for urban trams.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
benedetta mori ubaldini
Detail of an artwork by
Benedetta Mori Ubaldini,
displayed in the large
opening room.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
 The greatest challenge for the staging
of this edition of Triennale Design Museum
was that of giving consistency to a tale
that spans more than 90 years in the history
of design, consisting of over 650 works.
Philippe Nigro
Exhibition Designer
 The greatest challenge for the staging of this edition of Triennale Design Museum was that of giving consistency to a tale that spans more than 90 years in the history of design, consisting of over 650 works.
Philippe Nigro
Exhibition Designer
triennale design museum
Technical drawing for
the positioning
of pre-spaced decals.

2014 © Italo Lupi + Nicola-Matteo Munari
The Exhibition Path

The exhibition illustrated an unsung story of Italian design and craftsmanship, enriched by more than 650 works made by some of the most important authors.

The list of the designers exhibited included many of the greatest masters of Italian architecture, design, and styling such as Gio Ponti, Franco Albini, Carlo Mollino, Salvatore Ferragamo, Piero Fornasetti, Ettore Sottsass, Enzo Mari, and many others.

The objects were displayed in chronological order, starting from a small room dedicated to Fortunato Depero. While the “strada novissima”—a pathway that was entirely painted in white—was the major section featuring monographic rooms on both sides.
triennale design italiano crisi
The wall with pre-spaced decals,
righ in front of the great
staircase of Milan Triennale.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
triennale design italiano crisi
A view of the section
dedicated to autarkic design.

Ph. © Triennale Design Museum
The Set-Up

The stage design was characterised by poor materials that were evocative of both autarky and self-production, arranged in such a way to form “a urban scenario made of façades, curtains, and perspectives” (Silvana Annicchiarico).

Before the pathway, came a large room that housed a selection of the most representative objects of the three periods, mixed together and framed by elegant structures made of steel.

The exhibition was visited by nearly 200.000 visitors and was published by major national and international newspapers—The New York Times, Repubblica, Il Giornale, il Post—and magazines—Artribune, Domus, Doppiozero, Living, Klat, Il Giornale dell’Arte, etc.

—Nicola-Matteo Munari

Client
Triennale Design Museum

Responsible
Silvana Annicchiarico

Coordination
Roberto Giusti

Exhibit Design
Philippe Nigro

Graphic Design
Italo Lupi
Nicola-Matteo Munari

Project Date
2014